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Thank you for joining us for another installment in our our ongoing Journalism Tips series. We started this column as a way to help aspiring writers get their start in music, but over the couple months we have been evolving into a place writers come to have their questions about life in the business answered. Today we are continuing that effort with a response to a question posed by multiple reader in regards to how aspiring writers can make the most of their summer vacation. If you have any questions about developing as a writer/blogger in music, please do not hesitate email james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

Many of our readers are wrapping up another year of school this month or next, and if they’re fortunate enough to not absolutely have to find work right away their are several weeks of childlike freedom ahead. It’s an exciting time to be young, and for the young it’s an important time to be thinking about the future. Advertisers will tell you to embrace the now or otherwise live in the present, but if you want to make a career for yourself in the music business you should see the arrival of summer vacation as a door to opportunity that only needs your drive and passion to be kicked wide open. I cannot tell you exactly what you need to do in order to make yourself noticed by the industry at large, but by following the follows tips you will position yourself for success down the line. Making the most of that positioning and networking with the people you meet through those efforts is entirely up to you.

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"I understand what’s it like to work all week and on Friday night just want to go and leave your brain at the door, buy some popcorn and be thrilled by something.” - Don Cheadle

Hello and welcome to the final Haulix blog update of the work week. If you’re reading this post the day it goes then you’re likely joining us in the unsettling anticipation of the weekend ahead. It is Godzilla week, after all, and thanks to an early screening this week we already know it’s awesome. Before you run off to the cineplex however, we need to take a few moments and reflect on everything we’ve accomplished in recent days.

Each and every Friday we like to take a brief break from our regularly scheduled programming to update and reflect on everything happening at Haulix HQ. We are far more than a music blog, as many of you already know, and posts like this give us an opportunity to share more our efforts with all of you. If you have any questions about the content of this post, or if you are interested in learning more about the secure music distribution services offered by Haulix, please email james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

We have been telling you for over a month that we have a major addition coming to our anti-piracy toolkit, but we are still a week or two from the official roll out of the project.

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Hello and welcome to the final Advice column of the week. Earlier this week I was having a conversation with a fellow music writer when a story was shared with me that I knew would eventually make its way onto this blog. For the sake of privacy and the hope of not destroying anyone’s reputation, we have chosen to keep the names of people and groups involved in this story secret. If you have any questions about the content of the blog, or if you would like more information regarding the distributional services offered by Haulix, please email james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

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A couple years ago, a writer for a popular alternative music blog stumbled across a promising pop punk band online that had yet to be covered on any major music blogs. After listening to a demo from the group’s then upcoming EP, the writer reached out and expressed a desire to work together. The two hit it off right away, and even though the group did not have anything new on the immediate horizon the writer began trying to find ways to feature them on their site so that they could still be promoted to new listeners. The traffic clicking on those posts were low, yes, but they were still doing for for the band than anything other sites were doing to aide the group on their rise to the top.

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Hello and welcome to the eighth installment of Eric Morgan’s How To Kill Your Band. This column offers advice to up and coming artists from the perspective of a professional musician who has thrived with and without label support over the last decade. If you have any questions regarding the content of this blog, or if you would like to learn more information about the services offered by Haulix, please email james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

An Introduction:

I’ve been in the music industry as an artist for nearly 10 years now. In that decade I’ve achieved nearly all of my childhood music dreams, but I’ve also made just as many mistakes that run over my mind before I fall asleep each night. A wonderment of how a few different decisions, rerunning in hindsight, would work out in some alternate universe. This ever creeping determinism is a fallacy I’m quite aware of but one that I will never completely shake, though it’s these experiences I’ve learned the most valuable lessons. These are the things I’d like to share in a series of mini-blogs I call How To Kill Your Band.

Part 8 - Everyone Has To Start Somewhere

To kill a band, you have to start one first. This week I’m going to be diving into the musical influences that hooked me on playing music. I try to write music in some form almost every day  and after a recent fit with writer’s block I went back to my early roots to get some inspiration. In past interviews I’ve almost always been asked about my band’s influences but not so much as my personal gateways that encouraged me to start writing my own songs. So here’s the chance to relive my own musical adolescents and discuss the artists that shaped the way I look at music.

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Hello, everyone. Whether this is your first or one hundredth visit to our site we are beyond excited to have you joining us for this afternoon’s feature. We were asked way back in the fall of 2013 to begin speaking with more label owners, and it did not take us long to realize those professionals are some of the hardest in the entire music industry to track down for an interview. To date only a few names have graced our page, and today we add another as Triple Crown Records’ founder Fred Feldman finally shares his store. If you have any questions about developing as a writer/blogger in music, please do not hesitate email james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

For more than a decade Triple Crown Records has been a tastemaker for alternative rock and beyond. By forgoing the typical label approach of finding one sound to push, founder Fred Feldman and crew have made it a point to work with any artist they found interesting, regardless of genre. The result of these conscious efforts is one of the most diverse and beloved indie labels in existence, and today the story of how it all came together is being shared by the man who first brought the company to life.

I don’t remember where I was the first time I heard an album from Triple Crown Records, but if I had to take a stab in the dark it would probably be somewhere between 2003 and 2004. It was during this time that the label, which was only a few years old, began releasing albums by Brand New that would quickly become staples within the alternative music scene. Those albums hooked me, as well as thousands of others, to the label’s work for life even though many of their artists did not sound like a Jesse Lacey fever dream. I now own well over a dozen Triple Crown releases, and based on their current roster I am confident I will add many more titles in the years to come.

If you want to learn more about Fred and his efforts at Triple Crown, please take a few moments and follow the label on Twitter. Additional questions and comments can be left at the end of this post.

H: Please introduce yourself to our readers:

F: My name is Fred Feldman and I own Triple Crown Records

H: Thank you for joining us, Fred. We’re very excited about this.

F: No Problem, happy to help.

H: Before the music industry ever came along, what are some of your earliest memories of music?

F: Just being a fan, really.  From an early age I was a big fan of music. In high school I played in bands. Nothing good, of course, but I still love playing and being around music. I’m a little older than my audience, so when I was coming up I would take photos for actual fan zines and magazines, not websites. That was back when print was something special [laughs], but yea - decided I would like to have a career in it even though I couldn’t play and took an interest in the business side.

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Hello and welcome to another week of music industry insight and advice here on the official blog of Haulix. We are happy you decided to join us this afternoon, as we are kicking off the new work week with a conversation with one of the leading young innovators in music today. He’s had a hand in developing multiple businesses in recent years, and he has yet to leave his 20s!  If you have any questions about developing as a writer/blogger in music, please do not hesitate email james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

Adam Lopez knew from a very young age that he had a special relationship with music. He could not pinpoint why it interested him so much, but as he grew he found himself endlessly fascinated with the ins and outs of music, as well as the people who made it their life’s work. Realizing this, he did what every high school student trying to plan for their future does: He applied for college.

Less than one full year into his college education Adam had a second realization: His passion for music was stronger than ever, but the path he was taking to get started in the industry did not work for him. He was ready, or so he thought, and he began seeking a role within the industry that would allow him to start working right away. Craigslist provided a solution, and before he could call himself a college Sophomore Adam was packing things into boxes with plans to leave school forever.

Years have passed since Adam took a chance on his own drive to succeed, and the results of that risk taking are as numerous as the number of people who now follow Adam across various social networking platforms. He has his own management company, as well as a hand in several other properties across the business, and he still has plenty more he hopes to accomplish in the years ahead. We asked him to share with us the story of his life, and Adam was happy to oblige. You can learn about his journey below.

The first time I encountered Adam Lopez I was staring at my phone and my initial thought was, “How does this guy have so many Twitter followers?” His name was completely unknown to me at the time, but it was immediately clear that the thousands of people who wanted to know his every update, which included dozens of my industry peers, seemed to know something I did not. Adam was brilliant, funny, and incredibly insightful about life in the music industry. Even better, he was passionate about helping it evolve. I reached out a few days later to make contact for this feature, and nearly half a year later it has finally come to fruition.

If you would like to learn more about Adam, please take a few moments to follow him on Twitter. Additional questions and comments can be left at the end of this post.

H: Thank you for joining. Before we dive in, please introduce yourself:

A: My name is Adam Lopez, I’m a talent manager, and I am the founder of New Age Management based out of New York.

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A lot has been written about the supposed dire state of the music industry, but truth be told there are a number of successful and growing companies, including record labels, that are thriving in 2014. In this column we bring together every job opening we can find from the companies responsible for building the future of the  business and present them to you, our reader, in hopes of aiding you on your journey to join the global music industry professional family.

Each Sunday we scour the internet for the latest and greatest job postings throughout the music industry. You can help us better serve our community by sending any job openings you find or have to james@haulix.com. Be sure to include the name of the company hiring, a detailed description of the position being offered, a desired start date, contact information, and any additional supplemental information you feel may be needed.

Job Openings:

A&R Department Coordinator (Universal)

Job summary: Candidate will support the A&R team. Responsibilities will include booking studios, coordinating travel, assisting with budget preparation, preparing expense reports and heavy phones.

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Thank you for joining us for another installment in our our ongoing Journalism Tips series. We started this column as a way to help aspiring writers get their start in music, but over the couple months we have been evolving into a place writers come to have their questions about life in the business answered. Today we are continuing that effort with a response to a question posed by multiple reader in regards to where aspiring writers should focus their efforts. If you have any questions about developing as a writer/blogger in music, please do not hesitate email james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

In an age of social connectivity, those who favor the idea of crafting well-placed, intricate quality content on the web are not alone in feeling outdone by those who choose to keep their online content as brief as possible.  

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Hello, everyone. If you are reading this post the day it goes live then you are no doubt trying your hardest to look busy while slacking off in the final hours before the weekend arrives. That’s fine with us, but if you get caught just don’t go pointing the finger in our direction. Should you get fired however, we do have a job board ready and waiting to help you find a new career in music.

Each and every Friday we like to take a brief break from our regularly scheduled programming to update and reflect on everything happening at Haulix HQ. We are far more than a music blog, as many of you already know, and posts like this give us an opportunity to share more our efforts with all of you. If you have any questions about the content of this post, or if you are interested in learning more about the secure music distribution services offered by Haulix, please email james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

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This week’s biggest announcement is really only a pre-cursor to what we hope will be a much larger unveiling in the near future.

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Hello and welcome to our second Advice column of the week. This feature is a bit extra special because it also serves as our first collaborative piece with Daniel Alvarez, attorney at law and music business aficionado. We will be working with Daniel a lot in the months ahead, and we think the perspective he has on the business today is one that can aide both artists and industry professionals. If you have any questions about the content of the blog, or if you would like more information regarding the distributional services offered by Haulix, please email james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

As an entertainment attorney, it is amazing what I see from the sidelines of the music business. I feel like it is hard to shock me anymore due to all the craziness that has come across my desk. We have all heard horror stories about record labels label that treats a band wrong. Yet what surprises me, is how frequently I consult with a band about a bad manager experience but I hardly hear about that in public. Entertainers think it is a quasi-parasitic relationship where they accept that they are getting used for profit, but they are getting the career benefit of label support. The sharp difference for when a manager does something wrong, is that they are supposed to be on your team, so the entertainer almost never sees it coming. The hit hurts most when it comes from someone you trust. 

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