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Hello and welcome to the only Industry Spotlight column we plan to run this week. We made a conscious decision to run less interviews over the summer, but with fall quickly approaching you can expect many new conversations to make their way onto this blog in the weeks and months ahead. Some will be bloggers, others will be professionals working in other parts of the industry, but every single one will have something to offer those hoping to get a leg up on this crazy thing we call the music business.

This blog exists to promote the future of the music industry, and to do that we need input from people like you and your music-loving friends. If you have any questions about the content in this article, or if you have an artist you would like to see featured on this blog, please contact james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

We receive more requests to interview producers than probably any other profession within the industry, but those who work in that field tend to be so unbelievably busy that organizing interviews has consistently proven difficult. There are more than a dozen producers who have expressed a desire to participate in recent weeks, but most have so much going on it will likely be fall before they can think about joining us. One person was willing to rearrange things to make time for us, however, and that man goes by the name of Peter Junge.

Based out of London with a lifetime of experience and a degree in Recording Arts from Middlesex University, Peter Junge has been working in and around the music business for many years. He started as a musicians himself, but over time learned the skills needed to foray into the world of production. His history both on stage and in the studio gives Junge better insight into the complex relationships shared by musicians and their music, as well as the engineers hoping to capture their creativity. That, coupled with experience gained from working with the likes of Andy Wallace and Chris Lord-Alge, have made Junge a powerful force behind the board, and today he shares his journey with the world.

I will admit to being far more familiar with Junge’s work than his actual life prior to working on this feature, but now that I understand the experiences that made the man producing records today I feel I have gained a better appreciation for his art. My hope is that you will feel the same, but if not at least you can count of learning a few new tricks to apply when trying to get your start in the industry. If you have any questions or comments, please add them at the end of this post.

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Hello, everyone! Thank you for taking a few minutes out of your day to visit our blog. The feature you are about to enjoy takes an in-depth look at a simple trick to fighting piracy that many young artists overlook time and time again. It’s nothing too complicated, but it can make a world of difference on your overall sales.

This blog exists to promote the future of the music industry, and to do that we need input from people like you and your music-loving friends. If you have any questions about the content in this article, or if you have an artist you would like to see featured on this blog, please contact james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

This is going to sound a little crazy at first, but the availability of your material online is just as important to curving piracy in 2014 as the need to actively combat the proliferation links through Takedown Notices. That may seem counter-intuitive, as the spread of your unreleased material is typically not something you want easily available to anonymous people online, but there comes a point in every album promotion cycle where the exact opposite becomes true. Allow me to explain…

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Hello, everyone. We are thrilled to have you join us this day, or whatever day you happen to come across this article. We typically fill our weeks with band advice and editorials on life in the industry, but today we are switching gears to offer some advice to our clients. Don’t worry, our regularly scheduled programming will resume tomorrow.

This blog exists to promote the future of the music industry, and to do that we need input from people like you and your music-loving friends. If you have any questions about the content in this article, or if you have an artist you would like to see featured on this blog, please contact james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

One of the features available to clients that we receive the most feedback about is the ability to customize email invitations and promo pages. We have done everything in our power to make these pages completely customizable, but until today we never took the time to walk through each element of the design process. Let’s begin, shall we?

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Hello, everyone! Welcome to the beginning of a new week here on the official blog of Haulix. We are thrilled to know you have chosen to spend a few minutes of your time with us. This is the final week of August and we have done everything in our power to plan content that helps us end the month strong. Today, we’re taking a look at automation and how it may or may not be the answer to every problem you have.

This blog exists to promote the future of the music industry, and to do that we need input from people like you and your music-loving friends. If you have any questions about the content in this article, or if you have an artist you would like to see featured on this blog, please contact james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

The internet and the idea that automation will somehow save us all have long walked hand in hand through the world of business. Automation is the older of the two, with a history that dates back to the beginning of the 1900s, but it’s just as feisty today as ever before. The birth of apps, which came about as a direct result of the internet, created countless new paths to automation success for consumers and entrepreneurs alike. You can find apps to wake you up, send you reminders, check your blood alcohol content, check your blood sugar, track your steps, track your pregnancy, control your television, control your stereo, control your car stereo, start your car, pay bills, and a million other tasks - big and large - in between. The one thing no app can do, however, is make you a successful musician. They can help you, yes, but they cannot do the real work for you. 

What’s the real work? Good question.

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A lot has been written about the supposed dire state of the music industry, but truth be told there are a number of successful and growing companies, including record labels, that are thriving in 2014. In this column we bring together every job opening we can find from the companies responsible for building the future of the  business and present them to you, our reader, in hopes of aiding you on your journey to join the global music industry professional family.

Each Sunday we scour the internet for the latest and greatest job postings throughout the music industry. You can help us better serve our community by sending any job openings you find or have to james@haulix.com. Be sure to include the name of the company hiring, a detailed description of the position being offered, a desired start date, contact information, and any additional supplemental information you feel may be needed.

Job Openings:

Associate Dean of Admissions Marketing and Recruiting (Berklee)

Job summary: The Associate Dean of Admissions Marketing and Recruiting develops strategies to support the Deans enrollment vision. Oversees ROI on all recruitment marketing campaigns. Responsible for the Admissions digital marketing strategy through leverage of technologies including (but not limited to) Marketo and Salesforce. Oversees direct mail list segmentation to generate highly effective response rate for our various summer, undergraduate, and graduate programs. Ability to think strategically and monitor/adjust tactical implementation. An entrepreneurial, results-oriented outlook.

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After a little more than a month away it gives us great pleasure to reintroduce the Inside Music podcast. We learned a great deal from our first episode, including the necessity of high quality microphones, and have made several efforts to improve our production for this latest offering. If you have any ideas for how we can improve our efforts further, please reach out on Twitter.

This week’s episode features guest Zack Zarrillo, otherwise known as the founder of PropertyOfZack.com and co-founder of Bad Timing Records. Zack has been a fixture in the pop punk scene for the last several years, and though he’s only 21 he has already managed to carve a unique niche for himself in this business that has opened more doors than I am able to count. Our conversation revolves mostly around Zack’s efforts in writing, as well as his plans for future, but we do dive into his other projects and the problems that arise when someone takes on as much as he has in the past year. I’m really happy with the result, and I think those that listen to the full recording will learn to see Zack in a new way as a result.

The music you hear at the beginning of this episode is take from “That One Limp Bizkit Song” by California folk punk outfit Sledding With Tigers. Their debut album, A Necessary Bummer, is available now through Antique Records.

Our plan is to release a new podcast every week from here on out, and we already have another episode 90% complete. We hope you have as much fun listening to this show as much as we did making it. I know we’re not on the iTunes store just yet, but we will update you on that front soon. For now, let’s get to the show:

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Hello, everyone! After several weeks on hiatus in the Florida keys our Journalism Tips column has decided to return to the Haulix blog. The following editorial challenges writers to embrace mediocrity while examining the fears many aspiring professionals feel when tasked with review something they feel is neither good or bad, but rather something in between. We hope this post serves as a launching pad to further conversation and want to encourage anyone with an opinion on this topic to comment below with their thoughts.

This blog exists to promote the future of the music industry, and to do that we need input from people like you and your music-loving friends. If you have any questions about the content in this article, or if you have an artist you would like to see featured on this blog, please contact james@haulix.com. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

There is an adaptation of Lois Lowry’s classic young adult novel The Giver playing in theaters nationwide right now. I don’t know if you have had the time to see, and it to be honest it’s not exactly the greatest film ever made, but there is one idea present in both the original text and silver screen adaptation that has stuck with me. The story takes place in a dystopian future where society has fallen apart and been built all over again, only this time without emotion or color. As there is no emotion, people are taught to speak using precise language, including when describing how they feel. The word ‘love,’ for example,does not exist because it cannot be defined. Do your parents enjoy your company? Yes. Do they take pride in your accomplishments? Yes. Is that the same thing? Not really.

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I never expected to spend this week listening to the latest Taylor Swift single, but every single time I step foot into public “Shake It Off” is booming from whatever store window, car window, or boom box happens to be nearby. At first I was overjoyed. As a longtime fan of Swift, it was nice to know the reigning queen of crossovers was back. After a while, however, that joy turned to frustration because no matter what I did “Shake It Off” could not be shaken. It’s been rattling around in my head for days, and now that the weekend is here I think all hope of forgetting its infectious ways is completely lost. If you somehow missed out on its premiere, check this out:

Each and every Friday we like to take a brief break from our regularly scheduled programming to update and reflect on everything happening at Haulix HQ. We are far more than a music blog, as many of you already know, and posts like this give us an opportunity to share more our efforts with all of you.

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Hello and welcome to the one and only Industry Spotlight feature we are running this week. The person highlighted has well over a decade of experience, and the advice he has to share is nothing short of priceless. If you’re interested in artist management, marketing, or A&R in any way - this is the column for you.

This blog exists to promote the future of the music industry, and to do that we need input from people like you and your music-loving friends. If you have any questions about the content in this article, or if you have an artist you would like to see featured on this blog, please contact james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

Jason Davis may not be a household name, but during his years in the industry there is not a doubt in my mind that he has worked with someone you - and everyone you know - loves. He started out as a songwriter, and in the fifteen years since he has risen through the ranks to help lead several major companies. I did not know much about his experiences prior to conducting the interview below, but I was immediately blown away by the stories he shared. His career is what everyone aspires to in a way, and today he let’s us in on how traversed the ever-tricky world known as the music business.

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Hello, everyone. We are thrilled to have you join us. This post is more of an editorial than a column dedicated to advice, with a focus on the NFL and the way they’re trying to change live music through contract negotiations over the 2015 Super Bowl halftime show. It may not seem like the kind of thing that applies to bands working out of basements, but it does, and if nothing changes it could make an impact on festival and large event planning moving forward.

This blog exists to promote the future of the music industry, and to do that we need input from people like you and your music-loving friends. If you have any questions about the content in this article, or if you have an artist you would like to see featured on this blog, please contact james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

Earlier this week, The Wall Street Journal reported on a new development surrounding next year’s Super Bowl halftime show that sent a bit of a chill down my spine. I didn’t plan to write about it at first, but the more I thought about it the more it drove me insane.

The NFL has not paid the acts who performed during the annual halftime show for many years, but this year they’ve also begun asking the talent under consideration for the high-profile gig to pay to play, according to people familiar with the matter. The acts currently being considered are Coldplay, Katy Perry, and Rihanna, but none of that really matters right now because the offer being presented is a far more intriguing story. In my opinion, it is not only a bad idea for the Super Bowl, but if carried out it could set a very dangerous precedent in live music industry.

Since 2012, the annual ad revenue the NFL receives from the Super Bowl has been north of $240 million. In 2015, it’s likely that number will swell to $300 million or more, and it’s not hard to understand why. Every year, without fail, the biggest game in the NFL is also the most watched sporting event every single year, drawing over 111 million viewers in 2014 alone. Viewership like that equates to historically high ad rates, which in turn leads to growing income.

This year, 30-second advertising spots sold for $4 million. When Bruno Mars and Red Hot Chili Peppers hit the stage for the halftime show, they commanded the screen for about twelve minutes, which equated to almost $100 million in exposure (based on the advertising rates). In the mind of the NFL, that is lost potential revenue, and now it seems they want to make a change.

To quote WSJ direct: “While notifying the artists’ camps of their candidacy, league representatives also asked at least some of the acts if they would be willing to contribute a portion of their post-Super Bowl tour income to the league, or if they would make some other type of financial contribution, in exchange for the halftime gig.” There is no mention of how much that percentage will be, nor is there any mention of using the money received for anything other than widening the NFL’s income stream.

This is a clear cut example of corporate greed, and it’s not all that different from the way many labels take advantage of artists. The idea that ’the company does more for the talent than the talent does for the company’ is the same kind of backwards thinking that has ruined countless careers and relationships over the last 60 years. Katy Perry, Coldplay, and Rihanna are not artists in the mind of the NFL as much as they are untapped revenue streams. They’re not people, just commodities, existing to fill a demand the league apparently feels is taking away from their right to advertise. It’s not enough the performance happens under a title like ‘the PEPSI super bowl halftime show,’ even though Pepsi Co probably paid far more for that placement than any other advertiser buying a spot that particular year.

The most absurd part of this entire offer is the request that artists consider sharing a portion of future tour income. It’s no secret that appearing on the Super Bowl leads to an almost immediate jump in sales on tour revenue, but that does not mean artists are indebted to the NFL as a result of that boost. If someone got on stage at halftime and fell flat on their face, resulting in lost future profits, would the NFL be responsible for recouping the lost sales? No. And they would counter sue if anyone who tried to claim something different. That’s how bullies work. They lay claim to what is not theirs and go out of their way to ensure everyone around them feels as small and insignificant as possible.

One could argue that these new requirements help ensure the world never experiences another Janet Jackson fiasco, but that event happened ten years ago. Could the NFL still be so frightened by pop music that they feel such requirements must be implemented to ensure the cleanest, most family-friendly event possible? If so, why are Rihanna and Katy Perry contenders for next year? Coldplay are the only artists on the current short list who offer the kind of generic pop sound the league seems to desire, but they’re also the furthest thing from a ‘football band’ at radio today. Their music is good, but it’s not exactly the kind of thing that one would listen to when headed into battle (or celebrating a major victory).

What concerns me even more than the offer being presented by the NFL, however, is what will happen to the live music industry in the event no one fights back. It’s not hard to imagine major festivals and events taking cues from the NFL’s negotiation tactics and seeking new ways to raise revenue. Festivals may not have the millions of viewers the Super Bowl presents, but it can put artists in front of well over a hundred thousand people who may otherwise never see them. That reasoning is already being used to not pay many mid-level artists, so why not extend it to the headliners? Some may fight, but if they want to play in front of those crowds they will have to bend to the will of the people booking the event.

It’s almost terrifying to think, but it’s entirely possible that the fate of live music negotiations moving forward could be in the hands of Coldplay, Katy Perry, and Rihanna, but in a way it’s also true. If they do nothing and allow the NFL to steamroll their future revenue in exchange for twelve minutes of screen time they are not only selling themselves short, but making it okay for other corporations, sponsors, and booking agents to take advantage of talent. It’s up to them to take a stance, and something tells me they will. I hope so, at least.