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A lot has been written about the supposed dire state of the music industry, but truth be told there are a number of successful and growing companies, including record labels, that are thriving in 2014. In this column we bring together every job opening we can find from the companies responsible for building the future of the  business and present them to you, our reader, in hopes of aiding you on your journey to join the global music industry professional family.

Each Sunday we scour the internet for the latest and greatest job postings throughout the music industry. You can help us better serve our community by sending any job openings you find or have to james@haulix.com. Be sure to include the name of the company hiring, a detailed description of the position being offered, a desired start date, contact information, and any additional supplemental information you feel may be needed.

Job openings:

Managing Editor, SPIN (SpinMedia)

Job summary: SpinMedia is the web’s fastest growing entertainment publisher reaching more than 150M monthly pop culture, music and entertainment enthusiasts worldwide. Its influential and authentic brands afford brand advertisers unique access to impassioned and engaged audiences through a blend of professional editorial, expert opinion, user contributions, and customized marketing solutions. We are looking to bring on a highly organized, resourceful and energetic Managing Editor who will be essential to the core operation of the site. This position will be located at our Headquarters in our NYC office.

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It’s back! We told you last month that our hiatus from podcasting had come to a close, and as proof we’ve returned exactly fourteen days days later with our fourth episode ready to be shared across the world wide web. We know a lot of you have asked about getting this show on iTunes, and we promise that is on our immediate to-do list. For now, you can stream and download this show, as well as the rest of the Inside Music series, on Soundcloud

On this week’s episode, author and Modern Vinyl contributor James Cassar joins us for a conversation on life, love, and the pursuit of writing. James and I have been digital friends for a little over a year at this point, but the recording of this podcast was the first time we had actually had a real conversation with each other. You can tell we’re still trying to figure the other one out in a way, but in the end laughs are had and great stories are shared.

I told James this a bit when we were recording the show, but he is one of the few online writers I make it a point to read on a regular basis. His insight into music, as well as his sense of wordplay, are second to none in this industry. The best part of all is that he’s very much still getting started, which means he likely has many big, brilliant accomplishments on the horizon. To have him on the show is an honor, and I hope you enjoy our conversation.

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For the last couple weeks we have started this recap feature by sharing whatever record was spinning around the Haulix offices the past week. It’s inadvertently becomes something we look forward to sharing with our readers, causing many internal discussions about which clips and tracks should make the cut. Does it need to be this complicated? Not really. We just want to share great music while we are able and go from there. So, this week, please take a moment and meet become acquainted with The Last Bison:

Each and every Friday we like to take a brief break from our regularly scheduled programming to update and reflect on everything happening at Haulix HQ. We are far more than a music blog, as many of you already know, and posts like this give us an opportunity to share more our efforts with all of you.

We hate to keep you in suspense, but the biggest announcement of this week is actually something we have to keep secret for the time being. We can say that we are trying to revolutionize our already industry leading tools in ways that will make promo creation easier than ever for clients, but that’s all we can reveal right now. The rest will be rolling out soon, and you’ll find out about it first right here on this very blog. Maybe next week.

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Hello again. Thank you for joining us today. We have spent a lot of this week talking about the industry and how bands can better there efforts, but before we head into the weekend there is one additional industry profile that we wish to share. If you’re into photography, this post is for you.

This blog exists to promote the future of the music industry, and to do that we need input from people like you and your music-loving friends. If you have any questions about the content in this article, or if you have an artist you would like to see featured on this blog, please contact james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

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It’s not every day that someone writes us with a request that we consider their work in regards to planning our future content, but I have to be honest and tell you those are the email I open as fast as I possibly can. Why? Because it takes a special breed of person to speak out and let the world know they are doing whatever it takes to chase their dreams. Some people who do this may come across as egotistical at times, sure, but from my experience the people in the industry who are most vocal about their efforts have the results needed to back up their statements more often than not. This is a business that demands individuals take their career into their own hands if they ever hope to get ahead, and today we are thrilled to introduce you to one young woman who is doing just that.

Allison Newbold, otherwise known as Ally, has been building her reputation as a music photographer with an eye unlike any other since 2008. She knew she had a passion for photography from a very young age, and she realized early in her teen years that in order to make her hobby anything that could one day resemble a career she would have to do whatever she could to position herself for success. She shot every show she could attend, honing her skills and networking with groups of all sizes along the way, but things did not really begin to take off until Ally moved to Philadelphia in 2012. 

I never knew Ally’s name prior to working on this feature, but as soon as I began to scroll through her photography I realized I had been enjoying her work for years. She has an eye for this medium like very few do, and considering how young she still is it’s very likely that talent will only continue to develop in the years to come. Even more important than that however, is the fact Ally has taken her career into her own hands, accepting responsibility for her successes and failures as they come. It’s something I wish every young industry professional could do, and my hope is that learning Ally’s story will encourage others to take it upon themselves to make positive changes in their own lives.

If you would like to see Ally’s work and learn more about her life in music, click here to visit her official website. Additional questions and comments can be left at the end of this post.

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H: Before we begin, please take a moment and introduce yourself:

A: Hello, my name is Ally Newbold! Thank you for having me.

H: It’s great to have you with us, Ally. It’s rare that someone comes to us looking to be featured, but I am happy that you did. There’s so many people working in and around blogging today it’s often hard to figure out who has the best story to tell. Yours is pretty great, but before we get to it we should tell everyone a bit about your past. What memories of music do you have from your childhood?

A: Music has always been an important aspect of my life. As a kid, my dad would listen to a lot of jazz and blues but I found myself listening to pop music at a young age. I would dance in my room to Britney Spears and aspire to be as cool as Hilary Duff. I also had a huge crush on Nick Carter from the Backstreet Boys and also was a huge Green Day fan. Music has always played a major role in my life and I would not trade it for anything.

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Hello, everyone! Thank you for taking a little time out of your schedule to spend with us. We haven’t run as many advice columns as we typically do this week, but hopefully the appearance of this article will make a difference. Vinyl is big right now, but it’s not as big as everyone seems to think, and as a result it can cause serious problems for unsigned bands seeking to press their next release.

This blog exists to promote the future of the music industry, and to do that we need input from people like you and your music-loving friends. If you have any questions about the content in this article, or if you have an artist you would like to see featured on this blog, please contact james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

Before we begin I just wanted to say that this article was inspired by the news that the soundtrack to Forrest Gump is being pressed to triple disc vinyl in the near future. That said, it’s written with the hope of saving unsigned artists from taking on unnecessary debt for the sake of coming across as cool or hip.

It’s impossible to search for news on the music industry without stumbling across articles highlighting the continued decline in record sales. In fact, the only area of music sales that has seen any kind of consistent growth in recent years has been vinyl. Yes, the format many once thought dead has made a resurgence, causing labels of all sizes to begin pressing many more albums each year than the year(s) prior. What was once a popular trend amongst indie labels has now caught the attention of majors, thanks in part to events like Record Store Day, and as a result the market has become flooded with albums that, at least in my opinion, never really needed to be pressed to vinyl in the first place. More importantly, this upward trend in vinyl sales has led many unsigned artists to press their own records without the support of a label. I’m as big a fan of DIY artists as anyone you are likely to find in 2014, but as someone who owns a small record label and understands the costs associated with these releases I believe there are far better ways artists could be investing their money. 

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Hello, everyone. If you have been a longtime reader of this blog you may recall that our Journalism Tips series used to run each and every Saturday afternoon. With the recent launch of our podcast, however, that column has spent the past few weeks on vacation. That is, until today.

This blog exists to promote the future of the music industry, and to do that we need input from people like you and your music-loving friends. If you have any questions about the content in this article, or if you have an artist you would like to see featured on this blog, please contact james@haulix.com. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

There was a time in the distant digital past when a writer did not necessarily need to understand search engine optimization (SEO) in order to be successful online. Today, that kind of digital ignorance will only lead to a writer’s continued ambiguity in the world of music. In order to be successful online in 2014 you must have at least a basic grasp on SEO, but if not there are many, many resources available to help get you started. We cannot claim to have mastered this process ourselves, but we have done our best to gather the basic information you need to know in order to start creating content with a higher likelihood of landing on the front page of Google, Bing, and whatever search engines rise in the future. I’m not sure this will be a series, but if response demands it we will certainly share more.

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Hello and welcome to the dawn of another work week here on the official blog of Haulix. We are happy to have you with us this afternoon, and we think you will be thrilled to learn that we have finally delivered a brand new Artist Spotlight feature for you to enjoy. This interview touches on everything from finding a unique sound in metal, to the process of releasing your album in a country that is not your own. There’s a lot more as well, but I don’t want to spoil everything in the introduction!

This blog exists to promote the future of the music industry, and to do that we need input from people like you and your music-loving friends. If you have any questions about the content in this article, or if you have an artist you would like to see featured on this blog, please contact james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

There is a part of me that likes to pretend I am well versed in the world of metal, but the longer I work in music the more I realize that statement might as well be a bold faced lie. The world of metal, especially on a global scale, is too diverse and broad for anyone to claim a strong comprehension of everything. The best we can do is to try and attain a better understanding of the unknown and how it works with the music we know by heart. That is the idea that inspired this feature, and who knows? You might find your new favorite metal band as a result.

Black Trip are a group that could have started in 2003, but due to a number of factors unrelated to the interest of founding member Peter Stjärnvind the band did not begin to take shape until 2011. The eight years in between found Stjärnvind recording instrumentals at home alone, which were later used to lay the foundation for the group’s debut album, Goin’ Under. That record, which hit stores just last month, has since been released in the US by our friends at Prosthetic Records. You can stream a song from the record below:

I had never heard of Black Trip prior to receiving an advance of Goin’ Under, but I quickly fell in love with their throwback sound and the way it made the black metal nature of their lyrics feel a bit less brutal than your typical Swedish rock outfit. It’s the kind of album that belongs in rotation alongside the likes of Led Zepplin and Black Sabbath, only its far more dark than either artist ever dared to be. If that appeals to you, I wholeheartedly recommend giving the full album a spin when time allows.

Prosthetic recently asked if we would be interested in speaking with the band about their efforts to reach a global audience and how others can follow suit, but it took until the end of last week for us to set a date and time for that conversation to take place. This morning I spoke with vocalist Joseph Tholl over Skype and ended up enjoying our conversation so much that I felt it should run on the blog right away. You can find the best highlights from our interview below.

Goin’ Under is available now through Prosthetic Records. Click here to order the album.

H: Hello, how are you today?

JT: I’m doing great, actually. I’m spending the week over in London right now, which is why we have the bad connection right now. My service has been bad, but I made my way to a bar and found some great wifi.

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A lot has been written about the supposed dire state of the music industry, but truth be told there are a number of successful and growing companies, including record labels, that are thriving in 2014. In this column we bring together every job opening we can find from the companies responsible for building the future of the  business and present them to you, our reader, in hopes of aiding you on your journey to join the global music industry professional family.

Each Sunday we scour the internet for the latest and greatest job postings throughout the music industry. You can help us better serve our community by sending any job openings you find or have to james@haulix.com. Be sure to include the name of the company hiring, a detailed description of the position being offered, a desired start date, contact information, and any additional supplemental information you feel may be needed.

Job openings:

Sr. Manager, Business Development & Client Solutions (Nielsen Music)

Job summary: The Music division of Nielsen Entertainment is looking for a Sr. Manager of Business Development & Client Solutions, based in New York, to develop new business with independent record labels and assigned client verticals. The right candidate will have a proven and successful track record of strategic and consultative selling.

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The arrival of September is yet another sign that summer is coming to a close. That may make a few of you tan-loving readers sad, but those who have worked in the industry for a while know all the best albums come out in the fall. Right now we are on the verge of what could be the best fall for new music in recent memory, and as far as we can tell there is not a single genre lacking a major release in coming weeks. We will probably feature a slew of our favorites as time goes on, but today we’re going to keep it simple and introduce you to a lovely folk outfit known as Shakey Graves. Their latest album, And Then Came The War hits stores October 7.

Each and every Friday we like to take a brief break from our regularly scheduled programming to update and reflect on everything happening at Haulix HQ. We are far more than a music blog, as many of you already know, and posts like this give us an opportunity to share more our efforts with all of you.

On the development end of things, the first end of September was spent more on developing and refining tools than launching them. We have a very large list of planned updates and changes that we hope to roll out before the end of 2014, but as you know we like to things close to the chest until they’re ready for release.

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We try our absolute hardest to bring as much quality content as possible. Over the last year we have upped our efforts from five posts a week to seven, and from there we have been upping our game whenever time allows. I think the most we’ve ever posted in seven days is 10 articles, and I’m not sure we would want to do many more than that. People can only take so much information in one sitting, you know?

Anyways, we wanted to try make eight weekly posts a staple of our content plan, so today we are sharing a special guest blog from our friend Andrew Jones on the topic of whether or not the industry can be saved. This blog exists to promote the future of the music industry, and to do that we need input from people like you and your music-loving friends. If you have any questions about the content in this article, or if you have an artist you would like to see featured on this blog, please contact james@haulix.com and share your thoughts. We can also be found on Twitter and Facebook.

Nothing in this world can save the music business. Not a piece of software, not a fan initiative, no radio station or big idea. Nothing can actually save the music business.

Why?

Because it doesn’t need saving.

I grow weary of articles talking about this band or that website saving music. Music is fine, and for as long as people have souls, there will always be people who make their living making music to feed those souls. That has always been the case and it will be that way until the end of time. Humans need music, being a great musician takes time, time costs money, and people are willing to pay.

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